This is not my main blog, but only one of three blogs. The other two are my ancient HPoA blog on Wordpress (vladiiidraculea.wordpress.com), and my main blog on Dreamwidth, which I've only ever made one post to and is still under construction.

Tune in later for more info. :)

Tuesday, October 21, 2014
http://autisticadvocacy.tumblr.com/post/100524488004/whirling-ghost-the-fandom-4-autism-thing-is

deelaundry:

whirling-ghost:

The ‘Fandom 4 Autism’ thing is making me feel really sick and shaky. See this if you haven’t seen it yet (kind of pro A$ in the link so don’t don’t read it if that upsets you). And I’m not linking to something that horrible without a decent rebuttal.

Fandom has been my…

Friends of mine:  Please don’t participate in this “Fandom 4 Autism” thing, as it is raising funds for a terrible organization that is definitely not for autism, nor is it for autistics.

Please support Autistic Self-Advocacy Network instead.  Thanks.

This

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Whirling Ghost

Friday, October 17, 2014
When You're Not "Loud and Angry Enough"

spacerobotcrew:

chavisory:

k-pagination:

We clearly need to figure something out, as a community. When the Autistic community has scared a good amount of Autistic people into not being able to say things, what has it become? I was one of them, for a while. I’m not going into direct confrontations on Facebook (I don’t have spoons to deal…

So, I think the “loud, angry” approach has value, and has a place, and that the genuine anger that it comes from is absolutely valid.

What I think needs to go back to wherever it came from and stay there, is the party line that if you ask for a basic level of civility in some forums, you’re “telling people to be nice to their oppressors,” or that you “only care about safeguarding the feelings of oppressors,” or must only be seeking the approval or acceptance of the dominant group.

Or that if you say something like “hey, maybe this approach is not the most helpful right here in this context,” you are “silencing.”  Or that being uncomfortable with telling people to die is “tone policing.”

I’ve been wondering about this a lot. I think there is definitely, definitely, definitely need for anger and the “loud and angry” approach so don’t take this as me saying that isn’t valid, because I think it is.

What I keep wondering about is how to be an advocate and in advocacy communities when I don’t have a very angry temperament. Like, at all. And I do not particularly want to have one, it’s just not how I work. I was also raised in a family with an abusive mother who used anger as a way to… really not good things. So in my own space I sometimes literally need people to not yell at me if they want me to be able to process and think for myself and not just go into “cower and submit and apologize and tell yourself you are a bad person and hope the other person goes away” mode. I also can be slow to process and have emotional reactions about things, and I get scared sometimes that other people will get upset with me for not being righteously angry about things quick enough, or expressing it in the right way, or showing it loud enough. Again this fear may be from my family, one time I didn’t show emotion in the way my mom thought I should and she called me psychotic and sent me to therapy to try and fix me of it. But even without abuse, I think I just have a not-very-angry temperament and I think there can be power in that in different ways, I don’t think I need to keep justifying it in the hopes other people won’t just go “kphttbbbt, well obviously you are weak and defective and useless at advocacy if you’re not yelling at oppressors all the time and don’t want to”.

I guess I feel like people having all sorts of different emotional styles is part of neurodiversity and that there is no one right way and we need all sorts of different styles. I don’t actually feel like I am flawed for not getting angry easily and not particularly wanting to, just different. Annd… I need to stop typing and go to work. D: These are definitely not complete thoughts on this, just some bits of processing and wondering. Also again don’t take this as me saying the loud and angry approach isn’t valid (refer to my first paragraph here), but that I do think there can be power in different kinds of approaches. More than that, a variety of approaches are needed, because there are a huge variety of different people in this world! I feel like “people are really damn complicated” is my new motto. :P

-47

Thursday, October 16, 2014

chavisory:

When You’re Not “Loud and Angry Enough”

k-pagination:

We clearly need to figure something out, as a community. When the Autistic community has scared a good amount of Autistic people into not being able to say things, what has it become? I was one of them, for a while. I’m not going into direct confrontations on Facebook (I don’t have spoons to deal…

So, I think the “loud, angry” approach has value, and has a place, and that the genuine anger that it comes from is absolutely valid.

What I think needs to go back to wherever it came from and stay there, is the party line that if you ask for a basic level of civility in some forums, you’re “telling people to be nice to their oppressors,” or that you “only care about safeguarding the feelings of oppressors,” or must only be seeking the approval or acceptance of the dominant group.

Or that if you say something like “hey, maybe this approach is not the most helpful right here in this context,” you are “silencing.”  Or that being uncomfortable with telling people to die is “tone policing.”

I think it’d be a good idea for those people who, like me, didn’t “get it” right away, to make a clear set of lists illustrating the difference between, on the one hand, tone-policing (together with the various silencing tactics), and on the other, calling out genuinely awful tactics (like making death threats, making all-or-nothing (or all X pdeople or no X people) statements, telling all ones friends they can’t be friends with so-and-so anymore, etc.).

I’m working on something like that right now, actually, and I’ll be happy to post a link to it when it’s done. If any of you (e.g.: chavisoryk-pagination, and others) have any input you’d like me to make sure to list/include, please feel free to send it my way on FB (where I’m most likely to see it).

When You’re Not “Loud and Angry Enough”

k-pagination:

We clearly need to figure something out, as a community. When the Autistic community has scared a good amount of Autistic people into not being able to say things, what has it become? I was one of them, for a while. I’m not going into direct confrontations on Facebook (I don’t have spoons to deal with the arguing that would happen), but I’m writing this post.

The goal of a community is to not echo-chamber itself into only allowing certain ideas and viewpoints into it, which, frankly, has been a lot of what I’m seeing. People are attracted to the ideal that explosive, sometimes abusive behavior is okay when you’re part of an oppressed group. We as a community have dealt with a lot of pain. We’ve lost a lot of children, teenagers and adults to caretakers, and we’ve been abused in the name of therapy. I would not deny this community anger at things that have been done and are still being done.

The echo-chambering I’m seeing, though, is that if you’re not loud and angry and constantly scouring the bits of the Internet to confront and call out people, you are too polite and constantly want to make nice. The echo-chambering I’m seeing is permitting the silencing of some Autistic people through fear while saying that you’re being silenced when someone has a different opinion than you or wants you to stop yelling.

The dynamics of a community, the fabric of its being, does not rely on explosive techniques. The explosiveness I can no longer be quiet about drives potential allies and newly diagnosed Autistic people away as an unsafe space, and more importantly, many Autistic people may look at this community and wonder what is getting done, wonder if they even want to be part of it, and credibility is damaged. And what will we tell the people who aren’t privy to our conversations and are not able to join in, who may rely on us to help enact change in the community and society? What then?

(Somewhat of a sequel to my previous post, “Polarization”).

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

dendriforming:

Anything my brain can warp into a demand to shun people terrifies me.

Having a Very Bad Night because of this.

(((((hugs))))) <3 <3 <3 (three hearts) I heard about this last night and meant to send you an fb PM about it but spaced out. Anyway, I agree. This kind of behavior is really bad.

iwillberocksiwillbewater:

It is possible to think that someone is chronically fucking up in one area without thinking that everything they’ve ever done is worthless and that no good people should ever work with them on anything.

True. And it is possible — and a good idea to assume with someone whose other work is all about good communication skills — that the person in question is willing to learn from mistakes. :) (smilie)

I’m not entirely familiar with all of what’s been going on, but a friend of mine who is a fan of yours sent me a private message saying you were under attack over a poorly worded post that you have since removed. Anyway, I’ve liked the few Real Social Skills posts people have linked on facebook (sorry, I don’t do Tunblr much anymore due to dyslexia and just can’t keep up), and can’t imagine the person behind those posts could ever be an *intentional* transmisogynist.

I think we all make mistakes in areas where we have privilege — e.g.: as a white person, I know over my lifetime I’ve made too many mistakes around race to count, and it hasn’t always been easy to learn to recognize them even when I’m not being directly called out, but I’ve gotten better over time, and hope to continue to get better at it. And even though I’m trans too, I’ve said unintentionally transmisogynist things, too. And I learned from those mistakes.

Thursday, October 9, 2014
AVEN 2014 Survey

avenpt:

The Asexual Visibility and Education Network (AVEN) is performing a large-scale survey.

We are looking for any respondents who are part of the asexual spectrum, as well as people who are not part of the asexual spectrum. This survey includes some sensitive questions about sexual topics. Please share this survey so we can get a larger sample and therefore a more accurate result.

The survey is open for a short period of time. Later, statistical results will be published, providing crucial information about the demographics and needs of asexual-spectrum people.

Thursday, October 2, 2014
All an autistic person might want to know about circadian rhythm sleep disorders.

youneedacat:

Lots of autistic people seem to have circadian rhythm sleep disorders.  This is one area that autistic people and our parents tend to agree on about the aggravating parts of autism — the fact that our sleep is completely disrupted compared to a normal day’s sleep.  Parents hate it because it means they have to stay awake watching their children at all hours of the day and night.  Autistic people hate it because it makes having a schedule impossible, it can make it hard to keep a job with regular hours, and it can disrupt things as diverse as cognition, sensory overload, and pain levels.  Although some autistic people like it just fine, as well, and don’t seem to have any ill effects from it, a lot of us find it disrupts our ability to think and function and may add to overload and pain.

This post is super-long so the rest of it’s going under a cut. There’s a tl;dr at the end, or you can skim throughto the bolded sections that interest you.

 

Read More

Thursday, September 25, 2014

autisticadvocacy:

They’re telling my friend she can’t get routine cancer surgery…

webmuskie:

youneedacat:

1. Because she’s fat, and they’re afraid to operate on fat people. (Well, they’d be fine doing much more invasive weight-loss surgery on her, but the less invasive and much more straightforward hysterectomy, they’re scared of. That tells you everything.)

2. They spent a long time eyeing her…

I do think it would be a good idea to let Fletcher Allen, and its oncology department, know that people know about this crap.

The hospital has a contact form at https://www.fletcherallen.org/about/contact_us/


 But if you prefer other ways, here are the critical cut-and-pastes:

Customer Service: (802) 847-0000 or (800) 358-1144 (toll-free)

and

To speak to someone about your experience at Fletcher Allen: contact Patient and Family Advocacy at (802) 847-3500. Or you may use our online contact forms to share a compliment or share a concern.

  • Gynecologic Oncology
  • Medical Center Campus
  • Main Pavilion, Level 4
  • 111 Colchester Avenue
    Burlington, VT, 05401
  • Phone: 802-847-5110
  • Fax: 802-847-0496

Laura Tisoncik is an Elder in the Autistic and Neurodiverse communies. Without her efforts, we wouldn’t be nearly as far as we are. Please support her in this time of need. You can find out more about her situation at her post

(Source: withasmoothroundstone)

They’re telling my friend she can’t get routine cancer surgery…

youneedacat:

1.  Because she’s fat, and they’re afraid to operate on fat people.  (Well, they’d be fine doing much more invasive weight-loss surgery on her, but the less invasive and much more straightforward hysterectomy, they’re scared of.  That tells you everything.)

2.  They spent a long time eyeing her wheelchair and yammering about quality of life, which is always, when dealing with disability and healthcare and life-saving treatment, a euphemism for “You have no quality of life so saving your life isn’t a priority.”

Once she blogs about it, I’m going to be reblogging the fuck out of it, as often as I can.  This is one of my closest friends on earth and she saved my life through tumblr and I’m going to do my damndest to save hers through tumblr.

So once she posts what to do, I’ll be reblogging it several times a day if that’s what it takes, I know how many followers I have, and I know that tumblr saved my life, so it can save hers.

FUCK FATPHOBIC ABLEIST ONCOLOGISTS.  JUST FUCK THEM.

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

boycottautismspeaks:

After almost a year of grassroots activism, Boycott Autism Speaks has made real progress in revealing to the general public how Autism Speaks works against our community. We have reached out to their sponsors, and saw both Panera Bread and Build-A-Bear Workshop ending their partnerships. We have a long way to go, but have made some significant gains! Our voices are being heard!

Every social justice movement needs the commitment and hard work of many, and we truly appreciate the efforts of each and every one of you who have joined the boycott, called, e -mailed, sent letters and advocated locally for an end to the dehumanizing and harmful rhetoric of Autism Speaks. Together, we are making a difference in the lives of Autistic people. For too long, Autism Speaks has talked about our lives, and the lives of our families in ways that disrespect, stigmatize and exploit us. Together, we are changing that!

image

Image Description: Background is a brownish color with lighter color brown circles. Left hand side is the Boycott Autism Speaks symbol  and on the right hand side is the ASAN symbol. Text reads Join us! Boycott Autism Speaks & Autistic Self Advocacy Network of Washington state are teaming up to protests the Seattle Autism speaks Fundraising Walk Saturday September 27 10 am at Seattle Center . Details at http://asan-wa.tumblr.com/post/97844633835/of-protests-and-boycotts

As we continue to boycott and demand change, we are also very excited to announce that Boycott Autism Speaks will be teaming up with The Autistic Self Advocacy Network of Washington State to protest the Seattle Walk for Autism Speaks on Saturday, September 27, 2014 at Next 50 Plaza, Seattle Center at 10 a.m. . We encourage all who are interested to join us.

For more information:

http://asan-wa.tumblr.com/post/97844633835/of-protests-and-boycotts

Sunday, September 21, 2014
Mark Zuckerberg Doesn't Care About Ex-Muslims

This! There are *many* legitimate reasons that someone may wish not to use their legal names on facebook.

1:08 pm →
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Thursday, September 18, 2014

Of Protests and Boycotts

asan-wa:

It’s that time again! Next weekend, Autism Speaks will be holding yet another fundraising walk at Seattle Center, and once again, the Washington chapter of the Autistic Self Advocacy Network will be on hand with leaflets and protest signs, to let everyone involved know that Autism Speaks is a source of harm, not help, to Autistic individuals and our families. And this time around, we’re pleased to announce that we’ll be joined in this effort by a new partner: the grassroots organization known as Boycott Autism Speaks!
image


What a year it’s been. Last November, the leadership of Autism Speaks doubled down on their fear-mongering rhetoric about autism with a truly horrendous article written by their co-founder Suzanne Wright. True to form, Ms. Wright delivered an overwrought diatribe that portrayed our very existence as a crisis, a tragedy, and an unbearable burden upon our families. This time, however, it seems that the consequences of this dangerously irresponsible rhetoric caught up with Autism Speaks, triggering an enormous backlash of outraged responses, with an unprecedented number of parents and family members joining their voices with those of Autistic self-advocates, to send a clear message that Ms. Wright’s message of horror and despair did not reflect the true experience of our lives. John Elder Robison, the one Autistic person in any kind of token authority position in their organization, serving on a couple of minor advisory boards, resigned his roles at Autism Speaks in protest of Wright’s deeply misguided “call to action.”

This error was compounded when, just a few short days later, it was discovered that a recent Autism Speaks fundraising walk in New York City had provided vendor booth space to the Massachusetts institution known as the Judge Rotenberg Center. The JRC is notorious for their practice of disciplining their residents for disobedience through the use of painful electric shocks, an act of torture that has earned them condemnation from the United Nations for human rights violations. Their barbarism has long served as a painful example of the inevitable consequences of portraying autism as a crisis, tragedy and burden. By promoting the JRC as a valid resource for parents and families, Autism Speaks let the world know exactly where it really stood with regard to the human rights of Autistic people.

In the wake of these egregious offenses, a new grassroots organization coalesced, with Autistic self-advocates and parents of Autistic children joining forces to condemn the actions and rhetoric of Autism Speaks, calling upon their many corporate sponsors to terminate their relationship with the fundraising juggernaut. Pledging not to buy any goods or services from these sponsors until they cut off their donations to the Wrights’ organization, the group known as Boycott Autism Speaks was formed. These tactics were quickly proved to be effective when Panera Bread announced that they would no longer donate to Autism Speaks. Most recently, Build-A-Bear Workshop has agreed to end their partnership with the organization.

image


The momentum against Autism Speaks continues to build, and more and more of the general public is becoming aware that this organization lacks the legitimacy and the standing to represent the best interests of Autistic people. Now, Boycott Autism Speaks will be joining ASAN-WA on the ground as we once again gather to protest the Autism Speaks fundraising walk at Seattle Center. We encourage anyone who wants to join us in this effort to meet us at 10 a.m. at Next 50 Plaza in Seattle Center, on Saturday, September 27th. Together, we will continue to spread the word that Autism Speaks does not have the authority or the right to speak for us, and that we refuse to let the portrayal of autism as a tragedy dominate the public discourse about us.

Nothing About Us, Without Us!

[Image descriptions:

The first image is a photo of ASAN-WA members at last year’s protest each carrying at least one, if not two signs. The signs read things like:

“Don’t Cure my Identity”, “Neurodiversity is Normal and Natural”,  “My Neurology is not a Tragedy”, and “Autism Speaks Doesn’t Want Autistics to Speak”

The second image is of Boycott Autism Speaks’ logo: a light blue and light green background, where the left side is blue and the right side is green. On top of this in a darker green font, it reads “Boycott Autism Speaks”, where, under the word “Boycott” and above the words “Autism Speaks” there is a bolded pastel “does not equal” sign.]

Sunday, September 14, 2014
The Holocaust’s Forgotten Roma Victims
Friday, September 12, 2014

stimmyabby:

people complain about people “faking disabilities”
you know what happens way more often than people faking disabilities?
people pretending not to be disabled so they won’t get treated like shit

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