This is not my main blog, but only one of three blogs. The other two are my ancient HPoA blog on Wordpress (vladiiidraculea.wordpress.com), and my main blog on Dreamwidth, which I've only ever made one post to and is still under construction.

Tune in later for more info. :)

"romani"
Sunday, September 14, 2014
The Holocaust’s Forgotten Roma Victims
Sunday, June 3, 2012

A Brief History —

golden-zephyr:

Gypsy is the name given to Roma since they appeared in Europe in the thirteenth century, refugees from the widespread warfare that had overtaken their native India as part of the expansion of the Ottoman Turkish Empire. Europeans took these newcomers from the East for Egyptians (Egyptian, Egipcian, ‘gypcian, ‘gipcian, gipsy, gypsy) , and feared them because they were not Christians, they had no homeland, and their experiences with slavery and brutal oppression on their path westward had caused them to shun non-Romanies. Laws were passed forcing the Gypsies to move onward, at times penalizing them for their presence with death orders. Survivors were often shipped to Europe’s colonies abroad, where Romanies were exposed to indenture or slavery. Education and employment were forbidden to the living. This unreasonable hatred culminated in the murder of more than one million Gypsies/Roma by the Nazis. The misconceptions and oppression have continued: Today the Roma are Europe’s poorest minority, and neo-Nazis are screaming in the streets of Eastern Europe, “Gypsies to the gas chamber!” In some countries, they are allowed to live only in undesirable areas such as refuse dumps, and they are forcibly deported when they try to find better homes. 

Gypsies are NOT

• a lifestyle

• a set of behaviors

• a mythical people

• happy wanderers

We ARE

• an ethnic group of Asian Indian origin

• present on all continents since our diaspora began in the eleventh century

• organizing

• claiming our right to be free of racial stereotypes

HELP US END THE USE OF RACIAL SLURS!

Everyone has the right to say what they want.

We have the right to be offended and outraged.

Our people who even today are facing pogroms,

neo-Nazi death squads, and more hatred

have the right to live and prosper in peace.

A Brief Timeline of Romani History

997-­‐1026: The people now known as the Roma/Romani/Romanies begin to leave northern India,
headed west through Persia. The last migration begins in 1192.

1347: Due to plagues and wars, Romanies begin to move west again, through Armenia and Asia Minor.

1385: The first recorded transaction of Romani slaves is recorded in Romania.

1416-­‐1504: The Roma are expelled from Germany, Switzerland, Italy, Spain, and France.

1510: Switzerland imposes the death penalty.

1512-­‐1538: The Roma are expelled from Catalonia, Bavaria, Portugal, Sweden, England, Wales, and Denmark.

1538: Portugal deports Romanies to the Colonies.

1544: England deports Romanies to Norway.

1589: Denmark imposes the death penalty to all Roma.

1637: Sweden imposes the death penalty to all Roma.

1721: Emperor Karl VI orders the extermination of all Roma in the Austro-­‐Hungarian Empire.

1728: Last living Romanies hunted down in Holland.

1547-­‐1749: The Roma are expelled from Norway, Bohemia, Poland, Lithuania, Scotland, Denmark(again), Norway (again), Belarus, and Sweden (again).

1758: Empress Maria Theresa begins a program to assimilate all Roma by force.

1783: Most legislation against the Roma is repealed.

1812: Nomadic Romanies in Finland are confined to workhouses.

1822: Turnpike Act is introduced. All Roma camping along the roadside are fined.

1830: Germany begins a program of removing Romani children from their homes to be fostered with non-Roma families.

1848: Transylvania frees the Roma from 500 years of slavery, followed by Moldavia in 1855 and Wallachia in 1856.

1849: Denmark allows Romanies back into the country.

1868: Richard Liebich coins the phrase “lives unworthy of life.” This is later used by the Nazis to destroy the Roma alongside the Jews in the Holocaust.

1872 – 1899: Roma are expelled from Belgium, Denmark (again), and Germany.

1884: A Romni, Dr. Kavalasky, is appointed Professor of Mathematics at Stockholm University. She is the first female professor in Scandinavia.

1890: Germany organizes a conference on “The Gypsy Scum.” The “Central Office for Fighting the Gypsy Nuisance” gets its start there.

1906: France hands out identity cards to all Roma.

1920s: In the Weimar Republic, Roma were forbidden to use parks or public baths and required to register with police. In 1922, Germany begins a program to fingerprint and photograph all Romani. Professor Hans F. Gunther blames the Roma for introducing foreign blood into Europe.

1933-­‐34: Hitler comes to power in Germany. Romani musicians are barred from the State Cultural Chamber, forced sterilizations begin of all Romanies, Sinto boxer Johann Trollman is stripped of his title as lightweight champion, and “Beggars Week” means thousands of  Roma are arrested. Romani people who can’t prove German citizenship are expelled.

1935-­‐38: In Germany, all Romanies become subjected to the Nuremburg Laws for the Protection of German Blood and German honor. Roma in Germany lose the right to vote, the internment camp in Marzahn is opened, Hitler issues the General Decree for Fighting the Gypsy Menace, and the Racial Hygiene and Population Biological Unit of the Health Office opens. By 1938, all Roma in Germany are declared anti-­‐social, arrested, and sent into forced labor to build the concentration camps.

In Russia, Stalin bans the Romani language and culture.

1940: The first mass genocidal action of the Holocaust takes place in Buchenwald, where 250 Romani children are used as guinea pigs to test the Zyklon‐B gas crystals.

1941-­‐44: In Germany, in July, Himmler orders the Einsatzkommandos to “kill all Jews, Gypsies, and mental patients.” In 1944, the 1,400 Roma at Auschwitz still deemed fit for work are sent to Buchenwald.

The remaining 2,900 Roma attempt to defend themselves using rocks and sticks, but they are defeated and taken to the gas chambers.

1945: World War II ends, though it is still illegal to be Roma in much of post-­‐war Europe.

1962: The courts in the German Federal Republic declare that the Roma were persecuted in the Holocaust for racial reasons. Romani survivors do not share in the millions of dollars of reparations given to other survivors of the Holocaust.

1966: The Gypsy Council is set up in Great Britain.

1969: Bulgaria establishes segregated schools for Romani children. Countries across the former Soviet client states follow their lead.

1970: National Gypsy Education Council is established in England.

1971: First Romani Congress held in London, England, adopting “Gelem, Gelem” as the national anthem, as well as a national flag, based on the flag of India. Other considerations include a Romani alphabet, the protection of the language and culture, and human rights issues.

1972: Czech Republic begins to sterilize Romani women. The government claims the process ended in 2007, but reports of sterilization are still being investigated and the government has refused to pay reparations to the affected women.

1977: A UN sub-committee makes a resolution on the protection of Roma.

1979: The Romani Union is recognized by the UN’s Economic and Social Council.

1981: Yugoslavia grants the Roma national status.

1987: The United States Holocaust Memorial Council appoints its first Romani member, seven years after the Council was created.

1989: Germany deports foreign Romanies.

1990: Fourth World Romani Congress adopts an alphabet for the Romani language.

1991: The Roma gain equal rights in Macedonia.

1960-­‐1999: The Roma face persecution and death from attack by both civilians and governments across Europe. In 1997, Neo-­‐Nazi street gangs beat and kill Roma with impunity in Serbia. Periodic altercations continue, especially in Eastern Europe, where Romani children are relegated to back rows and special education, often beaten and ostracized by students and some teachers.

1998-­‐99 In the Kosovo Conflict, Romani communities are targeted by all sides.

2008-­‐9: Parts of a Romani settlement near Naples are burned by a mob. Italian authorities destroy another settlement, moving Roma to temporary quarters that lack water and electricity. The Prime Minister gives local authorities powers to carry out evictions and to fingerprint people, including children.

A widespread outcry ensues, but the European Commission does not ask Prime Minister Berlusconi to end the fingerprint provisions. Romanies from other EU countries are deported without individual appeal.

2009-­‐11 Neo-­‐Nazis intimidate and harass Romani communities in Hungary and the Czech Republic. Repeated violence, discrimination in employment and housing, and continued harassment from authorities continues across Eastern Europe, forcing many Roma to flee to Western Europe.

2010-­‐11 French police shoot and kill a young Rom at a checkpoint in the Loire Valley, resulting in riots. In response, French President Sarkozy orders the dismantling of some 300 Romani settlements, declaring the illegal camps sources of crime, and deporting Roma, most to Eastern Europe. Caught up in the police roundups are some Roma who are French citizens. Deportations do not allow for asylum or appeals. EU Commissioner Vivian Reding declares the expulsions violate EU provisions on freedom of movement, but eventually Sarkozy’s deportations are allowed to continue.

2011 In Kosovo, thousands of Romani refugees whose homes were destroyed in the War remain in refugee camps without appropriate hygiene facilities, located near or on top of rubbish heaps, which leach harmful substances into the water and soil, while other refugee groups have been given housing. One remaining camp populated by Roma in Mitrovica sits atop a heavy metal mine, leading to lead poisoning in the population.

This is a compact list, created to help readers understand the history of the Romani in Europe and the United States.

For further reading, we suggest:

The Gypsies by Angus Fraser, Blackwell Publishing, 1992.

We are the Romani People by Ian Hancock, The Interface Collection, University of Hertfordshire Press, 2002.

Shared Sorrows: A Gypsy Family Remembers the Holocaust by Toby Sonnema, University of Hertfordshire Press, 2002.

The Pariah Syndrome: An Account of Gypsy Slavery and Persecution, by Ian Hancock. Karoma, 1987.

The Roads of the Roma: a PEN anthology of Gypsy Writers, edited by Ian Hancock, Siobhan Dowd and Rajko Djuric, University of Hertfordshire Press, 1998.

Sunday, May 13, 2012
Guest Post: Racism against Europe’s Roma on the rise

aj-rromale:

The United States announced earlier this year that it would become an official observer to the Decade of Roma Inclusion 2005-2015. This is an international initiative that gathers governments and international and nongovernmental organizations into a concerted effort to improve the well-being of one of Europe’s most vulnerable minorities—the Roma, or gypsies—who have for centuries endured racism, discrimination, alienation, slavery, and sterilization efforts as well as a Nazi extermination campaign during World War II.

Washington’s decision to join the Decade of Roma comes at a crucial moment. While the Decade of Roma Inclusion has done much to initiate reform in European countries, it has little time left to meet its declared goals.

More than 10 million Roma live in Europe and I am one of them. My people still languish at the bottom of Europe’s social pecking order. They continue to suffer abysmal poverty rates as well as official and institutional discrimination in the areas of education, health, and housing. Roma joblessness is about eight times higher than that for people who are not Roma.

Violent attacks on Roma individuals, including murders and fire-bombings by neo-Nazis and others, have taken place in Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, Slovakia, the Czech Republic, and other countries. Most violence against the Roma, however, goes unreported due to the fear and mistrust Roma have for the justice systems in the countries where they reside.

Popularly, Roma are still reviled as thieves and burglars and used as scapegoats in the press and by right-wing political leaders seeking votes. Just a few weeks ago, for example, a right-wing Swiss magazine saw fit to splash across its cover the photo of a five-year-old Roma boy pointing a gun point blank at the reader; the headline read “The Roma Are Coming,” and the story discussed “crime tourism.”

The European Union has made a political commitment to support social inclusion of Roma. Last year, Brussels called upon European Union member-states to submit national strategies to further integration of the Roma into society. But European Union taxpayers are supposed to pay for the components of these strategies geared toward improving the Roma’s socio-economic position. Obtaining the necessary funding will require political leaders to look racism in the face and do the right thing.

Unfortunately, the economic crisis has been accompanied by unchallenged and racially motivated expressions of hatred that have spread from the extremes of political discourse and into the mainstream. The politics of hatred that promotes exclusion has been legitimized through democratic elections in some European countries and now has the potential to affect policy.

Neither the European Union nor the governments of its individual member-states have dared to address this issue in any meaningful way. Intergovernmental agencies, the United Nations, the Council of Europe, and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe lack sufficient leverage to press the European Union governments to meet the challenge on a scale that would provide the Roma with a sense of security.

For this reason, Washington should not merely act as a passive observer of the Decade of Roma Inclusion’s efforts. It should act as a catalyst for advancing the work of the initiative’s member states and organizations and for encouraging more organizations and countries—especially, Germany, France, and Italy—to join.

In its bilateral diplomatic dealings, Washington should press the governments of the European countries, and especially the European Union countries, to take legislative, policy, and judicial steps to ensure respect for the rights of the Roma people.

The United States should raise the issue of the security of the Roma minority with the European Union as a whole and with European Union member-states bilaterally and it should support human rights organizations in ways that will give them a stronger voice in pressing for respect for the rights of the Roma. The United States should also establish direct, regular communication links with Roma civic and political leaders and cooperate with them about racially motivated killings, violence, discrimination and police misconduct.

The United States should encourage the European Union to make development of a Roma-integration strategy a prerequisite for Serbia, Macedonia, Turkey, and other European Union candidate-member countries.

The United States was the deciding factor in achieving Kosovo’s independence and in ending Serb oppression of its Albanian majority. But Kosovo’s Roma, Ashkelije, and Egyptian and other non-Serb minorities have been left out of talks about the country’s future. The United States should press the government of Kosovo to work together with representatives of the Roma, Egyptian, and Ashkelije, and other minorities in establishing and meeting benchmarks on reintegration, property rights, and education and employment opportunities.

Finally, the United States should encourage governments to undertake consistent and robust legal action against the perpetrators of acts of discrimination and violence. Combating racist attacks on the Roma should be a matter of expressed government policy.

To this end, the Department of State should appoint a special envoy on combating racism and discrimination against Europe’s Roma–just as the Department has appointed the Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism.

A special envoy would work closely with the Roma community—which includes doctors, lawyers, journalists, civic and political leaders— who have made great contributions to communities across Europe.

Racism against the Roma people is one of the key challenges in Europe today. It erodes the notion of democracy that ensures universal values of humanity, peace, and prosperity for all. The United States role in the Decade of Roma raises hope of all of us that it will, in the words of Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, “address the plight of Roma on behalf of a freer, fairer and more inclusive Europe.”

Variant Perception

Friday, February 24, 2012

French Socialist Party presidential candidate calls for internment camps for the Roma

golden-zephyr:

In a February 12 interview on Canal Plus TV, François Hollande, Socialist Party candidate for president in the upcoming elections, proposed as a “solution” to the presence in France of Roma European Union (EU) citizens “the creation of camps … to accommodate them”.

The association of a “solution” in relation to specific racial groups with special camps can only bring to mind the period of Nazi rule in Europe, during which not only Jews and homosexuals, but also Roma and gypsies were rounded up and sent to extermination camps. This was not lost on many French people.

Hollande called for the establishment of “European rules to avoid our experiencing this constant to and fro [of the Roma]. Let there be camps that we can decide on, that is, to avoid these people settling just anywhere … [to] enable these people to go back to Romania … and not then return to France”.

Put more concretely, the Roma would be rounded up, and after their improvised encampments were broken up, they would be sent back to Romania, the same policy the present right-wing government of President Nicolas Sarkozy is pursuing.

The “Socialist” Hollande’s innovation is to suggest the building of internment camps and then preventing the Roma from returning by some sort of frontier control. Hollande is here attacking the free movement within the EU of these European citizens, one of the few progressive measures European capitalism temporarily conceded in the Schengen agreement in 1985.

Ruling UMP (Union for a Popular Majority) deputies pounced on Hollande’s statement to justify the brutality of the governments’ current policy. On RTL radio, minister for apprenticeship Nadine Morano, a rabid racist, claimed that she was “profoundly shocked” by this “outlandish proposal … We [the government] were the ones who organised the dismantling of the Roma camps with legal procedures, in accordance with French law”, while “Mr. Hollande is proposing the creation of camps for Roma in France.”

An estimated 12,000 to 15,000 Roma, citizens of Romania and Bulgaria, have legally come to France since their countries joined the European Union in 2007. According to the BBC, ten other EU countries, including Germany, Italy, Denmark and Sweden, which also welcomed Roma, are likewise introducing deportation policies. Measures adopted by a number of European states, including France, limit access to work and residence rights for Romanian and Bulgarian migrants until December 12, 2013, when the restrictions will end. It is clear that Hollande would not want to end these restrictions but, rather, extend and reinforce them.

It is difficult to distinguish Hollande’s statements from Sarkozy’s infamous Grenoble speech of June 30, 2010: “We’ll examine the rights and welfare entitlements, currently available to foreigners living in suspiciously irregular circumstances.… The general rule is clear: illegals must be directed back to their own countries”, said Sarkozy. He had already asked the interior minister “to put an end to unauthorized gypsy settlements. These are lawless zones not to be tolerated in France”.

EU commissioner for Justice, Fundamental Rights and Citizenship Viviane Reding accused the Sarkozy government of “discrimination on the basis of ethnic origin or race” and of calling into question “the common values and laws of our European Union”. She described the French policy as a “disgrace”. She implicitly compared the actions of the French government with those of the fascists during the Second World War. In the event, she backed down and Sarkozy has been able to continue with this “disgrace”.

Hollande is currently justifying Socialist Party-dominated town councils’ current practice in relation to Roma settlements. Essonne Info reported that on February 13, his campaign manager Manuel Valls, mayor of Evry, “by a mayoral municipal decree … called on the préfet [police chief] to clear by force the children and their parents and bulldoze their encampment”. There is no report that the mayor offered them alternative accomodation.

Discussion about the closing of frontiers between EU countries flared up in 2011, when Tunisian refugees fleeing state repression and devastated living conditions through Italy were prevented by the French government from crossing the Italian border, where they were legal, into France where many had family and friends.

The announcement of Hollande’s Roma “solution” came only days after the controversy created by Martinique deputy Serge Latchimi, who said that minister of the interior Claude Guéant’s comment that some civilisations were superior to others was close to Nazism. Hollande refused to support Latchimi’s position.

Hollande is appealing to the most backward elements in French society and distancing himself from wide layers of the population deeply opposed to the brutality of the state’s attacks on fundamental human rights.

When accused of being “soft” on illegal immigrants, Hollande likes to cite his election programme: “I will conduct an implacable struggle against illegal immigration … Legal residence will be granted case-by-case on objective criteria”.

The Socialist Party candidate did not offer any criticism of minister of the interior Guéant’s proud achievement of expelling 32,912 undocumented immigrants in 2011, up from 28,026 in 2010, a 17.5 percent increase.

In response to a remark by Sarkozy suggesting that Hollande favoured mass legalisation of undocumented immigrants, the Socialist Party’s Mireille Le Corre, in charge of “immigration-integration” policy, insisted: “François Hollande … is not for carrying out mass legalisations, but for re-establishing a fair and transparent procedure. Foreigners whose circumstances do not comply with a possible legalisation will go through an expulsion procedure, under conditions which respect their rights and their dignity”.

Hollande’s anti-immigrant positions are reinforced by the fact that the entire bourgeois and petty-bourgeois “left”—the Socialist Party, Communist Party, Left Party and New Anti-Capitalist Party (NPA)—worked actively with Sarkozy in Islamophobic campaigns to ban the burqa and, before that, the Muslim veil in schools. They are now all mobilising behind Hollande in the presidential elections in April-May to enable the French bourgeoisie to ride out the economic crisis by destroying the rights and living standards of the working class as is now under way in Greece.

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

note to nobody in particular: the term “gadje” is. not. a. racial. slur. nor is it necessarily offensive.

golden-zephyr:

toriathegadjeslayer:

it simply refers to someone who is not, or does not identify as, Rrom/Romani/Sinti.

that is all.

(Source: princessvittoria)

Monday, December 5, 2011

sisipunch:

Here is a guitarra for you, my little Chavo

If you’re slave to kissing

You gotta play this thing

I kinda just watch this to see how cute Sergey is and each time I think about starting up violin again I watch this, hear his playing, and then give up :I I’ll never be a cute old russian man like him—

(Source: mean-dauphin)

Thursday, December 1, 2011
golden-zephyr:

Unpopular opinion of the day:
Being patriotic and loving your country is one thing, however, I think there is another message hidden in these innocent looking promotions. Another message that is blatant in it’s exclusion. Who is that message about?
The Rroma.
Several years ago Romanian government wanted to change the country name. Why? To erase any kind of confusion between the ‘Rroma gypsies’ and the Romanian people.
Statements such as “Romanians can be the main attraction of this country. Romanians that show genius, spirit, charisma and old fashion authentic talent and passion. In a nutshell, valuable people”
In short—anyone who is not Rroma.
Rroma don’t have opportunity to show genius or talent and they are not considered valuable people.
If today is the National Day of Romania, then it is also the National Day of all the Rroma who are Romanian. Although victims of severe discrimination and oppression by their government and by many Romanian people, some Rroma have still managed to overcome everything and become well-noted people. These include (to name but a few):
Mircea Lacatus (Szamosújvár/Gherla, 24/3/1962)
Romani sculptor, graduated at the University of Arts in Bucharest, Romania. Resident in Vienna, has exposed his works in several international art contests, mainly in Austria, Romania, Croatia and Japan
Sergiu Celibidache(Roman, Romania, 11/6/1912 - München, Germany, 14/8/1996) 
Sergiu Celibidache was undoubtedly one of the greatest orchestra conductors of the 20th century. He belonged to the numerous Romani minority of Romania. He was the Chief Conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra from 1945 to 1954 and of the Orchestre National de France from 1973 to 1975. Celibidache was also the guest conductor of the Orchester des Süddeutschen Rundfunks, Stuttgart, and co-operated with the Münchner Philharmoniker. By personal conviction, he refused to recording his performances for commercial purposes.
Maestro Ion Voicu (Bucharest, Romania, 8/10/1923 -1997)
Considered the best violinist of Romania of all times, Ion Voicu was the founder of the Chamber Orchestra of Bucharest in 1969. He has performed with the most prestigious orchestras as the Berliner Philharmoniker and the London Symphony Orchestra, and with celebrities like Yehudi and Hepzibah Menuhin, David and Igor Oistrakh, Henryk Szeryng, Leonid Kogan, Cristoph Eschenbach, Monique Haas, etc.
Gheorghe Zamfir (Găeşti, Dâmboviţa, 6/4/1941) 
Gheorghe Zamfir is the most famous nai (pan-flute) virtuoso. Graduate as conductor in Bucharest, has introduced the pan flute in the most varied musical genres and has created the nai-organ style with innovative interpretations. He has performed in concerts worldwide, including Carnegie Hall of New York. For his achievements, he has received the Order for Cultural Merit of France, and the title of Chevalier of France, Belgium and Luxembourg. Zamfir has also published essays and poetry, and is also a painter, having presented his works in exhibitions. He has also a foundation for humanitarian and cultural purposes.
Johnny Răducanu(Brăila, Romania, 1/12/1931)
Called “Mr. Jazz of Romania”, is a pioneer of Jazz music in his country and an outstanding performer, mainly as pianist. He belongs to a Romany family of long musical tradition. He has played and recorded with many of the greatest Jazz artists, has been awarded with the Price of Excellence by the Union of Romanian Composers and has received an honorary membership of the New Orleans Jazz Academy. He is also the founder of the Romanian Jazz school and the President of Romanian Jazz Federation.

Thanks for listing all these accomplished people. I wasn’t aware that de ce Iubesc Romănia has refused to list Romania’s ethnic minorities of accomplishment, but if so, that’s a darn shame because all the people you listed are great Romanians, too, and well deserving of praise for their gifts to humanity.

golden-zephyr:

Unpopular opinion of the day:

Being patriotic and loving your country is one thing, however, I think there is another message hidden in these innocent looking promotions. Another message that is blatant in it’s exclusion. Who is that message about?

The Rroma.

Several years ago Romanian government wanted to change the country name. Why? To erase any kind of confusion between the ‘Rroma gypsies’ and the Romanian people.

Statements such as “Romanians can be the main attraction of this country. Romanians that show genius, spirit, charisma and old fashion authentic talent and passion. In a nutshell, valuable people”

In short—anyone who is not Rroma.

Rroma don’t have opportunity to show genius or talent and they are not considered valuable people.

If today is the National Day of Romania, then it is also the National Day of all the Rroma who are Romanian. Although victims of severe discrimination and oppression by their government and by many Romanian people, some Rroma have still managed to overcome everything and become well-noted people. These include (to name but a few):

Mircea Lacatus 
(Szamosújvár/Gherla, 24/3/1962)

Romani sculptor, graduated at the University of Arts in Bucharest, Romania. Resident in Vienna, has exposed his works in several international art contests, mainly in Austria, Romania, Croatia and Japan

Sergiu Celibidache
(Roman, Romania, 11/6/1912 - München, Germany, 14/8/1996) 

Sergiu Celibidache was undoubtedly one of the greatest orchestra conductors of the 20th century. He belonged to the numerous Romani minority of Romania. He was the Chief Conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra from 1945 to 1954 and of the Orchestre National de France from 1973 to 1975. Celibidache was also the guest conductor of the Orchester des Süddeutschen Rundfunks, Stuttgart, and co-operated with the Münchner Philharmoniker. By personal conviction, he refused to recording his performances for commercial purposes.

Maestro Ion Voicu 
(Bucharest, Romania, 8/10/1923 -1997)

Considered the best violinist of Romania of all times, Ion Voicu was the founder of the Chamber Orchestra of Bucharest in 1969. He has performed with the most prestigious orchestras as the Berliner Philharmoniker and the London Symphony Orchestra, and with celebrities like Yehudi and Hepzibah Menuhin, David and Igor Oistrakh, Henryk Szeryng, Leonid Kogan, Cristoph Eschenbach, Monique Haas, etc.

Gheorghe Zamfir 
(Găeşti, Dâmboviţa, 6/4/1941) 

Gheorghe Zamfir is the most famous nai (pan-flute) virtuoso. Graduate as conductor in Bucharest, has introduced the pan flute in the most varied musical genres and has created the nai-organ style with innovative interpretations. He has performed in concerts worldwide, including Carnegie Hall of New York. For his achievements, he has received the Order for Cultural Merit of France, and the title of Chevalier of France, Belgium and Luxembourg. Zamfir has also published essays and poetry, and is also a painter, having presented his works in exhibitions. He has also a foundation for humanitarian and cultural purposes.

Johnny Răducanu
(Brăila, Romania, 1/12/1931)

Called “Mr. Jazz of Romania”, is a pioneer of Jazz music in his country and an outstanding performer, mainly as pianist. He belongs to a Romany family of long musical tradition. He has played and recorded with many of the greatest Jazz artists, has been awarded with the Price of Excellence by the Union of Romanian Composers and has received an honorary membership of the New Orleans Jazz Academy. He is also the founder of the Romanian Jazz school and the President of Romanian Jazz Federation.

Thanks for listing all these accomplished people. I wasn’t aware that de ce Iubesc Romănia has refused to list Romania’s ethnic minorities of accomplishment, but if so, that’s a darn shame because all the people you listed are great Romanians, too, and well deserving of praise for their gifts to humanity.

Tuesday, November 22, 2011
aj-rromale:

golden-zephyr:

ציגײַנער־מוזיקאַנטן אין די קאַרפּאַטן אין די 1920ער יאָרן. ציגײַנער און קלעזמאָרים האָבן דאָרטן צוזאַמענגעשפּילט 
ביז דער צווייטער וועלט־מלחמה. 
Gypsy musicians in the Carpathian Mountains in the 1920s. 
 Gypsy and Klezmorim often played together until the Second World War.
[Source: Tsukunft]

tvismydj replied to your photo: ציגײַנער־מוזיקאַנטן אין די קאַרפּאַטן אין די…
There’s a documentary called Divan, & the lady who made it makes a special point of noting that were it not for Rroma musicians, many of the Klezmorim’s songs would be otherwise lost to history, &speaks to the debt owed those generations of musicians
Just wanted to reblog this with the reply.

aj-rromale:

golden-zephyr:

ציגײַנער־מוזיקאַנטן אין די קאַרפּאַטן אין די 1920ער יאָרן. ציגײַנער און קלעזמאָרים האָבן דאָרטן צוזאַמענגעשפּילט 

ביז דער צווייטער וועלט־מלחמה. 

Gypsy musicians in the Carpathian Mountains in the 1920s. 

 Gypsy and Klezmorim often played together until the Second World War.

[Source: Tsukunft]

tvismydj replied to your photo: ציגײַנער־מוזיקאַנטן אין די קאַרפּאַטן אין די…

There’s a documentary called Divan, & the lady who made it makes a special point of noting that were it not for Rroma musicians, many of the Klezmorim’s songs would be otherwise lost to history, &speaks to the debt owed those generations of musicians

Just wanted to reblog this with the reply.

Joaquin Cortes is Roma's Ambassador to the European Union

aj-rromale:

Graham Keeley in Barcelona; Independent http://news.independent.co.uk/europe/article2251355.ece

In the stuffy confines of the European Parliament, he cut an unlikely figure. A strutting peacock of a man, Joaquin Cortes is normally to be found stripped to the waist, dancing Flamenco in front of thousands of mostly female devotees.

Cortes2

This is the dancer who almost single-handedly used his talent - not to mention his looks - to make Spain’s most famous art form a must-see among the fashionable classes. But, though more used to hearing excited female fans shouting guapo (handsome), the one-time model for Giorgio Armani now wants to use his fame for a very different end.

Roma by birth, Cortes has become the new European Union ambassador for his people, in an effort to end decades of discrimination and xenophobia. 

Dressed in more sober attire than normal, the dancer recently addressed MEPs in Brussels. “The main reason for my presence here is that I am of Roma origin and I understand that this institution is known as the champion of human rights in the EU,” he said.

“I am one of the rare European Roma to whom fortune has been kind, as I am able to proudly assert my identity without fear of being persecuted, humiliated or being made a scapegoat.” He added: “We all have to fight for the integration of the Roma nation, and hope that in the near future a new generation will live a better life.” 

An EU report in 2005 on racism and xenophobia stated that: “Roma are often stereotyped as criminals. The reality is that many Roma are the victims of crime.” Many, particularly women, are marginalised by society, living in an underclass from which it is hard to break out. An EU resolution last year said Roma women suffered high levels of exclusion, particularly from access to health services.

There are now believed to be 14 million Gypsies in Europe, with at least nine million of those living inside the expanded EU. The largest contingent of two million live in Romania, but the Roma have perhaps the highest profile in Spain, thanks in part to Flamenco, the art whose origins are credited to them. 

Cortez1Cortes, who is currently dancing in Moscow for Russia’s new super-rich, has been fighting hard for the recognition of the Roma. He launched his own campaign, called Stop Anti-Gypsyism, seven years ago. One ambition is to try to rid the word “Gypsy” of the negative connotations which it sometimes has in the popular imagination.

He agreed to be the new ambassador for the Roma nation as the EU declared 2007 “the year of equal opportunities for the Roma”. He is to head a series of initiatives to try to get Gypsy artists equal billing with leading singers, dancers and artists throughout Europe. Away from the arts, the broad initiative aims to integrate the Roma in society. 

His people’s cause is close to his heart. Growing up Cordoba, Andalusia in the 1970s, Cortes watched as many of his contemporaries struggled to find jobs or often slid back into the murky world of drugs and petty crime.

About 800,000 Gypsies live in Spain, and they have been persecuted for much of the past 300 years. A series of laws and policies tried to rid them from the country altogether.

Gypsy settlements were often broken up and the residents dispersed. In some cases, they were forced to marry non- Gypsies. They were banned from using their language, which is a mixture of Andalusian Spanish and Romani, and prevented from taking up public office or joining trade organisations. Under General Francisco Franco’s dictatorship, Gypsies were harassed or their children forced to attend school. They became a permanent underclass.

Conditions for Spain’s Roma have improved considerably in the 30 years since democracy was re-established, with special state education programmes operating, and social services becoming more geared to their needs. But recent reports on Gypsy life have found high numbers are still illiterate and living on the periphery of Spanish society. Many run their own small companies, dealing within their own communities. Gypsy-run building firms mark their sites with the blue and green Roma flag as a warning that if anyone breaks in, they may have to reckon with reprisals from Gypsy “security”.

Huge slum dwellings like Los Tres Mil (The Three Thousand) in Seville and San Cosme in Barcelona were traditionally used as dumping grounds by local authorities to separate Gypsies from the rest of the community.

A dancer with Gypsy roots

  • Joaquin Cortes is a native of Andalusia, the birthplace of flamenco. He was born into a Gypsy family in Cordoba on 22 February, 1969.
  • The Cortes family moved to Madrid in 1981, where at the age of 12, Cortes began to take formal dance lessons. He was invited to join the Ballet Nacional de España in 1984, taking to the stage in venues as diverse as the New York Opera House and the Kremlin.
  • His wild, passionate approach to flamenco earned him worldwide recognition and controversy. He once said, “In classical ballet they still dance with a nude torso. Why not in flamenco?”
  • In 1992 Cortes founded his own company, “Joaquin Cortes Ballet Flamenco”. A starring role in Pedro Almodovar’s 1995 film, La flor de mi secreto, brought him a new audience, as did Carlos Saura’s film, Flamenco, and he regularly tours worldwide.
Friday, November 18, 2011
Integration of the Roma remains the sole alternative | Radio Bulgaria

aj-rromale:

Tatyana Obretenova
English version by Radostin Zhelev

© Photo: BGNES

The leaders of the European Union adopted in June 2011 a framework for the drafting of national strategies regarding the integration of the Roma. According to estimates of the European Commission, the most vulnerable community in Europe amounts to 10-12 million people. By the end of the year the member states ought to present their strategies to the European Union executive body, pointing to ways to integrate the Roma living on their territory. They are going to use the additional EUR 350 billion under the common financial policy of the Union over the period 2007-2013. The majority of the funding will be provided through the European Regional Development Fund and the European Social Fund. 

The draft National strategy for the integration of the Roma in Bulgaria 2012-2020 and the accompanying action plan were presented in Sofia during the outgoing week. The paper encompasses the four main spheres of the social and economic inclusion of the Roma: employment, education, health care and housing. According to the minister in charge of EU funds absorption, Tomislav Donchev, the drafted strategy is feasible, but the true challenge will lie in the implementation of the action plan. He pointed to three major prejudices that the Bulgarian society ought to get rid of. 

© Photo: BGNES

“The first prejudice regards the attitude of the majority, which claims that the integration has no alternatives for a number of reasons: economic, ethical, humanitarian, political, etc.,” Tomislav Donchev pointed out. “The second thing regards the minorities. Integration means assistance, specific and expedient policies, but also accountability and respect of rules. The third warning is for the acting and future politicians: integration does not include wishful thinking only.” 

According to vice premier Tzvetan Tzvetanov, who is also president of the National Council on Cooperation in Ethnic and Integration Issues, there is mistrust in Roma integration. He argued that the strategies implemented so far, including the Decade of Roma inclusion, which took off in 2005, had yielded no results. 

“The most burning issue is the housing of the Bulgarian Roma,” Mr. Tzvetanov says. “It requires the biggest amount of expenditures from the state budget, and also the greatest amount of efforts on the part of municipalities. We have to rely on European solidarity, if we want to succeed in integrating the Roma into the Bulgarian society. We have drafted projects to the tune of EUR 8 million under the Ministry for Regional Development and Public Works, which, if put to good use, could give a kick start for future fruitful results in that respect. In drafting the projects we have drawn largely on the positive experience of other member states and the advice of the World Bank, which managed to implement such practices in Hungary and the Czech Republic.” 

© Photo: BGNES

The inclusion of the Roma will have a very powerful impact on the European economy, Bulgaria’s included, Markus Repnik, Country Manager of the World Bank for Bulgaria, claimed. According to 2010 WB estimates, the Roma in Bulgaria lose up to EUR 2 500 in potential revenues on an annual basis, while the government stands to lose some EUR 350 million. The reason for this is that only 13% of the Roma complete secondary education, which leads to poor employment opportunities, i.e. for loss of possible remuneration. In the words of Mr. Repnik, every single euro invested in the education of the Roma would yield a EUR 7 return on investment to the state budget. Moreover, as Education Minister Sergey Ignatov put it, education breaks down the ethnic boundaries. Another thing is that by raising the awareness of the Roma on health issues, the quality of their health care will also improve. That is why the strategy has allocated some EUR 5 000 on a yearly basis for talks to young Roma on prevention of early or unwanted pregnancy, as well as another EUR 5 000 for the implementation of the annual immunization campaigns.

The draft of the National Strategy for the integration of the Roma in Bulgaria 2012-2020 and the action plan are yet to be discussed in the respective ministries before their final adoption by the Council of Ministers and presentation to the European Commission in Brussels.

(source: Radio Bulgaria)

Monday, November 14, 2011
How Can Gypsies Recover

aj-rromale:

Our author and editor Ali Mezarcıoğlu gives answer of the question “How could Gypsies Recover?” in the last part of his book named ” The Book of Gypsies”. Ali Mezarcıoğlu, who explains the things have to be done for solution of problems of Gypsies in 5 article, reminds that solution of Gypsies’ problems is also an important issue of humanity. Suggestions of Mezarcıoğlu, who emphasizes importance of creating foundations to represent Gypsies all over the world, concern all peoples besides Gypsies.

From “the book of Gypsies”- How could Gypsies recover? page 146-147

a- Gypsies have to realize that they are members of an universal nation. Gypsies have to escape from the feeling of frustration of thousands of years learning history of themselves and non-Gypsies.

b- Foundations which are able to represent Gypsies all over the world have to be created and Gypsies have to make themselves heard by means of the foundations.

c- Damage in the soul of humanity created by the culture of warrior non-Gypsies have to be declared to humanity and peacefull characteristics of Gypsy cultures have to be announced as an ideal. For that purpose, communication channels have to be prepared either for Gypsies and non-Gypsies and Gypsy culture have to be explained as a common value of humanity using these channells.

d- The only solution for Problems of Gypsies and all humanity is to wake up the soul of our common ancestors, natural human beings. The realities that -humanity is a big family, it’s meanless to classify humanity nobles and non-nobles, anykind of discrimination depending on differencies is a great crime against humanity- have to be explained to everybody.

e- Waking of the soul of natural human beings is the only way to stop threats targeting nature and society. Gypsies’ being visible on the stage of history as a well organized universal nation will make possible to communicate with the culture of natural human beings over Gypsy identity for all human beings.

Source: Ali Mezarcıoğlu, Çingenelerin Kitabı; Cinius Yayınları

(source: Çingenelerin Sitesi)

This reminds me very much of what Cornel West, Michael Eric Dyson, and Henry Louis Gates Jr. have said over the years on the Tavis Smiley show about African Americans, especially when it comes to the choice made by most African Americans durring the mid-19th century through the mid-20th century to choose a peaceful path despite what had been done to them by whites.  Likewise, there are parallels with much (though not all) of Native American history since Europeans first invaded the Americas, and Australian Aboriginal history since the British invaded Australia.

So yeah, it’s a problem for all of humanity how society treats minorities and peoples who have been downtrodden for centuries.

Sunday, November 13, 2011

Czech party drafts petition against discrimination of the majority by the “Gypsy minority”

golden-zephyr:

News server iDNES.cz reports that one of the parties in the local municipal coalition governing Ústí nad Labem, the Party of Health, Sport and Prosperity (Strana Zdraví Sportu Prosperity - SZSP), has drafted a petition demanding an immediate end to the “discrimination of majority-society members” by the “Gypsy minority”. Political scientists say the party is reaching out to its voters through what are rather extremist practices and statements.

The title of the petition is: “Petition for an immediate end to the moral, physical and financial discrimination of all who uphold the laws and work by inadaptable population groups, in particular the Gypsy minority.” “We have called the state of affairs as we see it. This is our proposal for solving it,” party chair Zdeněk Kubec told iDNES.cz.

In the petition text, the party demands, among other things, the introduction of laws that will take strong action to reduce crime. The text also demands the state stop giving advantages to the “Gypsy minority” and the abolition of state support for nonprofit organizations that are “doing a brilliant business in privileging the Gypsy minority.”

The petition’s introduction also includes the following statement: “We are not extremists, we are not racists, we are educated people and athletes.” However, Miroslav Mareš of Masaryk University in Brno says that to a certain extent, parties that make such statements are encroaching on the dominant area of traditional right-wing extremists’ activities. Local civil rights activist Miroslav Brož says that “mainstream politicians are legitimizing fascist opinions in society.”

This is not the first time that a local politician in the north of Bohemia has used such vocabulary recently. The Vice-Mayor of Cvikov, Jaroslav Švehla, said last Tuesday at a meeting of mayors in the Česká Lípa district that Romani people are not “inadaptable”, but rather have very rapidly adapted to a system that makes it possible to steal, not work, and live on welfare.

“Let’s call things by their real names. The Roma do not want to work, they don’t want to learn, and even if there were a thousand jobs available in the Česká Lípa district, they wouldn’t go to work. For most Roma who have not been working for 20 years, it is the case that this is a trade passed on from father to son,” Švehla told iDNES.cz.

Source: ROMEA.CZ

European racism in action. I really don’t see how a minority can discriminate against a majority…. 

This ^

Friday, November 11, 2011

aj-rromale:

In Bucharest, a flash mob against discrimination

George Lacatus

Last Saturday, in downtown Bucharest, two young Roma women were harassed by a group of young men. Out of the blue, the group of young people started an argument. When the boys become more insistent, the girls asked their friends for help. All of a sudden, the girls began to dance around the boys, to the tune of a famous Roma song.

After a few seconds, the boys responded, and started to dance in return. In just a few minutes, they formed two camps, one of girls, other of boys and both began to duel through dance. The two sides soon found sympathizers: for the girls camp, Roma, Romanians and even Chinese, while the boys were able to draw on their side the Romanians and even an African-American youth. The dance duel lasted for about four minutes, after which young people instantly dispersed.

This flash mob dance was organized by the Roma non-governmental association “Romani CRISS”. “The flash mob’s purpose was to convey the message “Say NO to discrimination “. What we want to convey through dance, and with the help of young people, is simple: regardless of ethnicity, color, occupation, sex or age, we are first of all PEOPLE”, says Ms. Margareta Matache, the executive director of the “Romani CRISS” organization, in an interview for www.romatransitions.org.

Other participants in the flash mob included Roma actors (Doinita Oancea, Madalin Mandin), Romanian actors (Carmen Tanase, Ionut Ghenu, Andrei Goncz) and young people of all ethnicities and nationalities who wished to join in. The event took place under the guidance of the choreographer Ioana Macarie and of the assistant choreographer Mircea Ghinea.

(source: Roma Transitions)

golden-zephyr:

La belle Nuria au cirque Romanès avec le Finzi Mosaique Ensemble..

Minoush ( trad sepharade turque) 
infos groupe : www.doczik.com
www.myspace.fr/finzime
contact : doczik@yahoo.fr

(Sourced from Maria Robin’s Facebook :) Not sure of the exact translation, but there it is!)

Love the video and song!!!… and just everything about this~

Nuria! voj, sukare luludjijo~!!!!

I have always loved this song, but I wasn’t aware it was a Romani song, I thought it was a Sephardic Jewish song.

Monday, November 7, 2011

aj-rromale:

“Soumnakai” by Latcho Drom

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